ONE Condoms
Condoms : How to Avoid Common User Errors

  

Condoms are 99% effective at preventing pregnancies and STI’s. This is of course, only if you use them properly. 

50 studies recently gathered 14 countries during the years between 1995 and 2011 have been analyzed by the Kinsey Institute Condom Use Research Team (KICURT). These studies highlight a number of user inflicted condom errors. Some of the mistakes include using a sharp object to open the packet, putting a condom on too late or by taking it off too early.

These studies found that between 17 and 51.1 % of people put a condom on after sex has already begun and between 13.6 and 44.7 % percent said that they take it off too early. Even at the lowest outliers, 13 % of people is still too many in ONE’s mind. These studies also found that up to 45.7 percent of men surveyed did not leave space at the tip of the condom for semen.

Studies regarding condom efficacy are commonplace however much attention has not been given to how consistently and properly condoms are used by their user. ONE Condoms wants all of our users to safely and properly know how to use a condom. Included in every ONE Condoms packet are detailed instructions on how to properly use a condom. Here’s how to use condoms correctly.

First, handle with care. You should always remember to store condoms in a cool, dry place. Condoms don’t like extreme temperatures. Also, do not use if expired. Tear open the package carefully. Do not use your fingernails, teeth or anything that could damage the condom. Make sure to push the condom away from the foil notch when you are going to tear. Once out of the package, roll the condom on with your fingers before any sexual contact. Remember to pinch the receptacle tip of the condom between your thumb and forefinger. This prevents air from becoming trapped at the tip of the condom and allows space for semen. Use the condom during the entirety of your sex session. Using lubricant will reduce the risk of your condom breaking also. Once finished, hold the base of the condom after withdrawal. 

Remember condoms are only effective if used properly. ONE Condoms keeps you protected and informed from harmful and unwanted diseases. Many infections could be avoided by improved user effectiveness. A portion of every ONE Condoms sale goes towards HIV/AIDS prevention efforts at home and abroad.

Stay safe and use ONE everytime.

Friday Links Roundup 2/23/12 - Condoms, Safe Sex, Sex Education
Controversial Condom Campaign to Deliver Free Condoms to Teens

A new federally funded program is delivering free condoms to teenagers in many California counties. The orders are taken online and delivered straight to the teens’ homes in a nondescript envelope.

This free mail-order condom program is supported by the California Department of Public Health and was launched by the non-profit California Family Health Council (CFHC). The initiative, available through teensource.org, provides 12-19 year olds a place to order free condoms online and find locations where they can pick up free condoms from sexual health clinics across the state.

This program is targeting California counties where the number of STD cases are on the rise. Any teen in San Francisco, Sacramento, San Joaquin, Alameda, and Kern counties can receive free condoms through the program.

According to CFHC’s vice president of public affairs, Amy Moy, “We can’t keep our heads in the sand and pretend there isn’t a problem. Research shows barriers such as embarrassment or concerns around confidentiality or affordability,” limit teens from buying condoms.

Some parents aren’t thrilled with the plan however which sends a package of condoms, lubricant and an educational pamphlet to teens. Some parents argue it encourages the 12-19 year old demographic to engage in intercourse. Repeated studies have shown just by providing teenagers with access to birth control and sex education does not encourage this behavior.

Since its launch on February 14th, over 550 order have been placed online. 

ONE® Condoms is a supporter of comprehensive sex education and positive sex behaviors. ONE® Condoms aims for universal condom use and safe sex practices. A portion of every ONE® Condoms sale goes towards HIV/AIDS prevention efforts at home and abroad.

Do you think that it’s a good idea to provide free mail-order condoms to teenagers? 

Weekly Links Roundup 2/16/12 - Condoms, Safe Sex, Sex Education

   

It’s Friday and that means it’s time for our ONE® Condoms weekly links roundup. ONE® is here to keep you in the know and up to date with all news relating to condoms, safe sex, and sex education. 

During this #nationalcondomweek, how will you be spreading the safe sex message? Will you be sharing where you wore it during your last sexual experience?

Please submit additional links we might have missed regarding sex and relationships.

Condoms

AIDS activists launch million-condom tour in Venice Beach

NYC’s ‘Condom Finder’ App’s Valentine’s Upgrade

Are Condoms Restricting the Flow of the Adult Film Industry in Los Angeles?

Condoms trend on Valentine’s Day

Free condom program in Keys promotes safe sex

California initiative offers free condoms to reduce transmission of STDs

National Condom Week aims to educate

National Condom Week: ‘Where did you wear it?’

'International Condom Day' 2012

Catholics, Condoms and the Separation of Church and State

Safe Sex

Group opens dialogue to recognize safe sex methods

New safe sex campaign aims to lower Nunavik’s “alarming” STI rates

National Condom Day encourages safe sex

Thai NGO advocates safe sex in Bangkok red-light districts

Truckers are savvy about safe sex

Irish students fail to grasp safe sex message according to new SHAG week survey

'Tekkin Charge' on Valentine's Day

Sex Education

Does sex ed keep girls from becoming teen moms?

Sex education: far from decent

Let Utah voters, not lawmakers, decide on sex education for their kids

City sex education text targets families

Teachers urged to address porn factor

Let’s talk about sex

Happy National Condom Day and Valentine’s Day!

   

Happy Valentine’s Day to everyone and more importantly happy National Condom Day! National Condom Day comes at an ideal time to encourage condom use when love and passion is in the air. National Condom Day serves to remind people of the risks associated with sexually transmitted infections (STIs), unplanned pregnancies and to take necessary precautions by practicing safe sex. By taking responsibility of your sexual health and using a condom every time during sex, you will keep yourself protected from unwanted and harmful diseases.

National Condom Day and National Condom Week aim to make the conversation of condom use more comfortable for people to talk about and address the misinformation associated with condom use. ONE Condoms aims to make condoms as socially acceptable as toothpaste and safer sex as second nature as wearing a seatbelt.

A Planned Parenthood in the Northwest has just launch a new website called “WhereDidYouWearIt.com" for Condom Week. This site offers condom users a chance to share their location of the most recent sexual encounters, the reason they used condoms, and how good the sex was. The location is not saved or shared with anyone publicly. 

And there’s a lot of sharing to be done on this National Condom Day. It is reported that approximately 87 condoms are used every second in America on Valentine’s Day.

ONE Condoms aims for the universal practice of condom use and for everyone to engage in safe sex behaviors. A portion of every ONE Condoms sales goes towards HIV/AIDS prevention efforts at home and abroad.

Would you share your secret location and tell the site why you used a condom? Also, how do you plan on staying safe this national condom day / valentine’s day?

       

Friday Links Roundup 12/2/11 - Safe Sex, Condoms, Sex Education

Happy Friday fellow sexual health advocates! Today ONE brings you a Links Roundup on the most relevant stories surrounding the world of sexual health over the past week. It’s our commitment to keep you in the know and help keep you sexually protected.

ONE donates a portion of each sale to HIV/AIDS prevention efforts at home and abroad. So stay safe through the weekend, and although World AIDS Day has ended, remember the beginning of ending AIDS starts with you!

Safe Sex


Safe sex among city youth (with video)

More Sex is Safe Sex – The High School Edition, Part I

Health Classes That Focus on Testing Promote Sex Among Teens

Rules are Different for Men and Women in India When it Comes to Sex

Contraception Rightly Empowers Young People to Have Safe Sex

Condoms on June 2012 Ballot? Porn Initiative Inches Closer

Seattle ranks high for safe sex

Kelly Rowland promotes safe sex initiative

Safe Sex Commandments

City Promotes Safe Sex for World AIDS Day

Bollywood Preaches Safe Sex on World AIDS Day

Condoms

             

LA porn condom initiative moves closer to ballot

When He Won’t Wear a Condom (World AIDS Day Edition)

Glowing dress made of condoms getting glowing remarks from fashion experts

Celebrate Indonesian Condom Week 2011

Beware Of PETA Members Dressed As Giant Condoms Today

World AIDS Day: 10 tips for using a condom

Giant Condom for World AIDS Day

Condoms With Teeth Fight Rape in South Africa

Pope Benedict is still not doing enough in the fight against AIDS

30 Years of AIDS: 6200 Iconic Posters, 100 Countries, 1 Collector

Sex Education

           

Online Tool Teaches Indonesians Sex Education

Sex Ed Issue Revives School Board 24–DOE Dispute

Americans, Britons and Canadians Disagree on Sex Education

Sex education films cause unease among British parents

Abstinence-only sex education doesn’t work, say UGA researchers

Let’s talk about sexual health: the 8th EPSA Autumn Assembly

Barbara Herrick: GOP stance on sex ed unrealistic

Testosterone Overloaded ‘Macho’ Men More Likely to Practice Safe Sex

      

In a recent study conducted at the University of Michigan, testosterone loaded guys aged 18 and 19 were found to have a more accepting attitude towards condoms and safe sex practices than low-testosterone males. High testosterone levels are linked to boldness, confidence, and high risk life choices. These results are the first to demonstrate a link between higher testosterone levels and less risk-taking in any domain to date.

According to researcher Sari van Anders, “safe sex behaviors and people who engage with them can be seen in a negative light. The ‘social risk’ of insisting on using a condom might require more boldness and confidence than having unprotected sex.” The new findings reveal that safe sex could feel like a riskier move than unprotected sex does to men.

The study consisted of 78 men answering questions about their health, sexual activity, and attitudes towards condom use. Each man provided a saliva sample to measure testosterone levels. 

The results revealed that men with higher testosterone levels had more positive attitudes about safe sex than lower-testosterone men. It’s possible that men get an ego boost (and testosterone boost) from safe-sex practices since it signifies them as knowledgeable about sex and bumps up their social status. Although this study was focused just on attitudes, actual behavioral research is in the works to see whether the testosterone-safe sex link holds up behaviorally.

ONE Condoms will be tracking the development of this research as more findings come to light. ONE wants to make condoms as socially acceptable as toothpaste and safe sex as second nature as wearing a seatbelt. ONE Condoms donates a portion of each sale to HIV/AIDS prevention efforts at home and abroad.

So, tell us fellas. Do you think you high T levels make more accepting of safe sex practices?

Friday Links Roundup 11/18/11 - Safe Sex, Sex Education, Condoms
Condom Ads of the World

Check out these ads from Germany. Their message was “use a condom, and be sure you’re not bringing the next Osama bin Laden, Adolf Hitler or Mao Zedong into the world.” Although the hairdo’s are enough to scare the living daylights out of you, we got a kick out of them. ONE Condoms believes in desired pregnancies, safe sex and the prevention of terrorism, of course. 

       

ONE Condoms believes in a future where practicing safe sex is considered universal behavior and as normal as using toothpaste. ONE Condoms donates a portion of every sale to HIV/AIDS prevention efforts at home and abroad.

Can Birth-Control PIlls Kill Your Libido?

    

New research is pointing to a possible link between contraception use and decreased sex drive. The Indiana University study examined the negative effects of contraception on things like arousal, lubrication, and orgasm. Involved were 1,101 sexually active women split into groups of hormonal contraception use (the pill, patch, ring or shot) and non-hormonal use (condom, diaphragm, cervical cap, or withdrawal). The evidence revealed that women taking hormonal contraception experienced less arousal, fewer orgasms, difficulties with lubrication, decreased sexual pleasure, and less frequent sex compared to women using barrier methods.

A major reason for this low sex drive is due to hormonal levels in each contraceptive method.  When a woman takes “the pill”, the liver starts pumping out sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) which traps most of a woman’s testosterone, leaving low T levels to which directly incite sex drive.

Throughout the menstrual cycle, these hormonal fluctuations can alter the facial appearance of a woman, body odor, and vocal pitch. During ovulation, these physical changes make her more attractive to a man due to the indication of fertility. But since the pill prevents ovulation, women on these hormonal drugs miss out on the peak period where they radiate of sex appeal and make them more attractive towards men.

According to Dr. Goldstein, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at NYU, “What distinguishes one pill from another is the amount of estrogen it contains and the type of progesterone that it’s married to. It’s a matter of finding the combination that works best for you,” in order to minimize decreased sexual pleasure and inability to climax.

Hormonal pills have scientific evidence that the pill reduces the risk of getting ovarian cancer, developing anemia, and reduces symptoms of PMS. However, this very popular method of contraception comes with an endless list of side effects including nausea, breast tenderness, risk of heart attack, stroke, blood clots, high blood pressure, liver tumors, and gallstones.

So, if the pill is dampening your sex drive, it may be time to end your relationship with oral contraceptives and avoid its complications by switching to condoms. Contraception pills that dull your libido defeat the purpose of taking it in the first place.

ONE Condoms believes in the practice of safe sex and the protection of your overall sexual health.

What are you personal experiences with contraception and its effect on your libido?